Continuous wire welder

The continuous wire welders are particularly suitable in all those cases where high productivity and optimal welding quality are required. The professional continuous wire welders use, depending on the material to be welded, a specific combination of Hydrogen and Gas (Argon) to protect the weld pool, making the weld bead with a perfect finish free of slag. The high productivity is given by the coil of the metal wire which supplies the ...

Continuous wire welder

The continuous wire welders are particularly suitable in all those cases where high productivity and optimal welding quality are required. The professional continuous wire welders use, depending on the material to be welded, a specific combination of Hydrogen and Gas (Argon) to protect the weld pool, making the weld bead with a perfect finish free of slag. The high productivity is given by the coil of the metal wire which supplies the necessary material for the creasing of the weld in a continuous way.

continuous wire welding

The only limitation of the continuous wire welders is the use in the presence of wind that would divert the escape of the shielding gas. However, this limit is easily overcome by using the so-called "cored wire" which is none other than the metal wire of the coil, coated as occurs for the electrodes in MMA welding. Keep in mind that with cored wire you will not have the same finish as gas welding, and that cored wire coils are very expensive compared to classic uncoated ones. Under gaseous protection it is normally welded with the wire in positive polarity, while when welding in NO-GAS mode it is necessary to connect the torch to the negative polarity of the welding circuit.

MIG welding

The melting of the wire leads to the detachment of drops of molten metal which are transferred into the weld pool; as the current changes, the size and quantity of drops that detach over time also vary, consequently the method of transferring the metal takes on different names:

  • Spray transfer (Spray Arc)
    • High Current
    • More than 50 small drops per second
    • High deposition rate of filler metal
    • Suitable for working on not thin thicknesses
  • Immersion transfer (Short Arc)
    • Low Current
    • Creation of a liquid bridge between the wire and the metal to be welded
    • Suitable for working on thin thicknesses
  • Pulsed Arc Transfer
    • Modulated current with average value between the values of the Short Arc and Spray Arc regimes
    • A suitable pulsed current generator is required
    • Control of the detachment of every single drop
    • Precise management of heat input, necessary to avoid breakthroughs when welding metals with high thermal conductivity (aluminum and its alloys)
    • Suitable for working on thin thicknesses
    • Aesthetically valid results in visible welding

If you are in the current range between the values of the immersion and spray transfer and you do not have a pulsed current generator, the transfer occurs in a disordered way with large and variable droplets: this regime is called globular regime (Drop Arc) , a modality that we try to avoid as the electric arc is difficult to manage and the welding generates many sprays.

Continuous Wire Welder Video Guide Deca

Video guide offered by Deca to introduce you to the purchase of your continuous wire welding machine.

With wire welders it is possible to weld Steel, Stainless Steel, Aluminum and Bronze, taking into account the percentages of Hydrogen and Oxygen shown in the table below:

Material Way CO 2 ARCO 2
80/20
ARCO 2
82/18
ARCO 2
92/8
ARCO 2
98/2
ArO 2
98/2
Ar
Steel Short / Spray Arc No Spray Arc - - - -
Pulsed Arc - - - -
Stainless steel Short / Spray Arc - - - -
Pulsed Arc - - - -
Aluminum Short / Spray Arg
Pulsed Arc
- - - - - -
Bronze Short / Spray Arg - - - - - -
Brazing Short / Spray Arg
Pulsed Arc
- - - - - -

Terminologies Useful for the purchase of the Continuous Wire Welder

B.C

AC

A.D

Direct current

2AC

Double Output Alternating Current

Duty Cycle

The Duty Cycle is the number of minutes in a 10 minute interval during which a welding machine can work continuously on a current date. The Duty Cycle relative to the maximum current depends on the temperature at which it is measured; Telwin declares all Duty Cycles at an ambient temperature of 40 ° C.

MIG Brazing

It allows to operate at temperatures lower than MIG welding (1000 ° C instead of 1500 ° C) with less deformation problems of the welded elements. The materials are joined by the fusion of the filler material only. Wide application in the automotive sector.

Post Gas

It controls the gas flow after the end of the welding, guaranteeing the cooling of the material in an area protected from oxidation.

More
    per page
    Showing 1 - 15 of 30 items
    Showing 1 - 15 of 30 items